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Psalm 90:1 –2: From Everlasting to Everlasting

This setting of Psalm 90:1 –2 was created and submitted by Regina Jupp and focuses on the idea that even in chaos we can find rest in our everlasting God.

Psalm 90

Reflection:

51CEB357-B352-4339-AD22-A4EFE034ABE4 - Regina Jupp

How does this psalm piece interpret the psalm? 
Lord, you have been our dwelling place in all generations” (v. 1). Most scholars believe that Psalm 90, the oldest psalm, is a psalm of the Israelites wandering in the desert. This is a song of a people wandering, out of place and vulnerable. They remind themselves that, though everything feels chaotic, God has been their sanctuary, God has sustained and protected them through the transitions and hardships of ages, from Adam to Moses and even today. Even when all else falls away, God will provide safety, and God will be our dwelling place.  

Before the mountains were brought forth, . . . from everlasting to everlasting you are God” (v. 2). Before the mountains were made and until all we have seen has turned to dust, God will be in control. We can rest in the power and safety of God’s eternal promises.  

From our limited perspective, the world is filled with chaos and vulnerability. But for God, nothing is or has ever been out of control. God has everything in hand, from everlasting to everlasting. In this painting, one can see beauty, order, and promise emerging from chaos. Imagine mountains being called up from the depths as the Spirit of God moves all things into place. It is easy to lose the sight of the breathtaking, unimaginable majesty of God. When we are lost, wandering, or scared, we can rest in God’s Word. 

Liturgical Suggestions:

This could be digitally projected or printed on bulletins. It could be displayed on an easel during a sermon series or hung in a quiet space for personal reflection. 

Image available:

Copyright Information:

Art: Regina Jupp, © Regina Jupp  
Used by permission.  
Contact: Regina Jupp, Regina@ReginaJupp.com 

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