Program

Symposium on Worship: January 29 – 31, 2015

Grand Rapids, MI, USA

Each day of the conference begins and ends with worship. Thursday is devoted to in-depth study on a particular topic (four-hour seminars). Friday and Saturday include plenary talks and hour-long workshops.

 

Day of Learning with and from the Worldwide Church
Over 100 overseas international guests—pastors, worship leaders, musicians, church leaders, and more—from more than 30 countries have been convened for the Symposium on Worship. They will spend the day interacting together and sharing their wisdom on worship practices from their local contexts. Our prayer is that this gathering will form networks and deepen connections among these leaders, and encourage and equip them in their teaching and leading roles.  

8:30 am Worship Services:

Tim Blackmon, preaching, 2 Corinthians 1:1-11: The Comfort of God
With participation by Eileen Guenther, organ
Calvin College Chapel

Pablo Jiménez, preaching, 2 Corinthians 2:12-3:6: The New Covenant
Covenant Fine Arts Center Auditorium

Travel time and refreshment break

Seminars:

Seminar 1: Water From a Deep Well: Learning From the Riches of Historical Worship Practices
Catherine Gunsalus González, Justo González, Young Richard Kim, Karin Maag, Jerry Sittser, Eric Washington
We worship together today in solidarity with millions of fellow believers across time and space. Their wisdom and experiences have much to teach us about breadth, height, length, and depth of God’s triune beauty, about the joys and challenges of ministry, and about the central practices of worship—preaching, prayer, artistic expression, baptism, and the Lord’s Supper—that transcend time and place. While this wisdom may not solve technical challenges we may face in ministry, it is an indispensable resource for deepening our capacity to make wise choices. Thanks to the work of many pastorally-oriented historians, this wisdom is increasingly accessible to brand new believers and lifelong Christians.

This seminar, hosted by Karin Maag, will feature several of these pastorally-oriented historians:

  • Gerald Sittser, author of Water From a Deep Well: Christian Spirituality from Early Martyrs to Modern Missionaries
  • Catherine Gunsalus González, author of Lecciones del culto antiguo para la iglesia de hoy/Resources in the Ancient Church for Today's Worship
  • Justo L. González, author of A History of Christian Thought (3 volumes), covering 2000 years of church history
  • Karin Maag, author of the forthcoming Worship in Calvin’s Geneva and co-editor of Worship in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
  • Eric Washington, expert on African American church history from late 18th – 19th century and African-American church missions to Africa
  • Young Richard Kim, expert on early church history and translator of St. Epiphanius of Cyprus: Ancoratus

They will share with us vivid examples of how specific historical practices, events, and personalities can challenge, encourage, and inspire us. Then together, we can reflect on how communities make “drawing water from this deep well” a regular practice.

Seminar 2: The Most Important Word in Preaching: Story or Exposition?
Mike Graves and Scott Hoezee, hosted by Paul Scott Wilson
For centuries preachers were told that exposition of the biblical text is the most important and sacred task of preaching. In recent decades the emphasis has shifted more toward storytelling. "Show, Don't Tell" is a well-known adage to anyone who aspires to be a creative writer. "Showing" a concrete story or image always packs more vivid emotional punch—and is for that reason much more memorable—than the "telling" of information could ever achieve. Human beings are, after all, "narrative animals" who frame most everything that happens to them in terms of story. But what about a sermon’s impact beyond the emotional? What about the biblical illiteracy rampant among church-goers, as well as those who stay home on Sundays? Can storytelling help with those issues? Scott Hoezee and Mike Graves think there is much preachers can learn from stories, but maybe there are some limitations too. What is the most important word in preaching these days: Story or Exposition?

In this seminar Graves and Hoezee will present some compatible and contrasting ideas from their recent books, including some hands-on exercises to demonstrate what this approach looks like in action. The time will also provide ample opportunity for dialogue and conversation.

Seminar 3: Seven Streams of 21st Century Congregational Song: Skills for Leading the People's Song in a Musically Multilingual World
Moderated by C. Michael Hawn, with contributions from James Abbington, Jorge Lockward, Emmett Price and the Hampton Church Academy alumni, Martin Tel and the Princeton Seminary Choir
The last twenty years has not only featured a profusion of new congregational songs, but also a profusion in new types and styles of congregational song. Musicians are increasingly called to be adept at leading quite different types of songs—as well as working collaboratively to empower others to do so. This seminar will present a clear, vivid description of seven streams of congregational song, and provide practical tools and examples for the unique kinds of leadership skills needed for music in each stream to enliven singing in your community. 

Seminar 4: From Vision to Execution
Linda Witte Henke
This hands-on, seminar will mine sources of inspiration, explore concrete examples of liturgical art, and participate in demonstrations of hands-on techniques. The seminar will be facilitated by award-winning liturgical artist Linda Witte Henke, with the assistance of her studio associate, Christine Felde.

Seminar 5: The Sound of Scripture
Joy-Elizabeth Lawrence
We spend hours planning and rehearsing music for worship. But what about scripture? If scripture is a central component of worship, how can we more intentionally and creatively present the text so that it is rehearsed, meaningful, and emotionally compelling? Answering both "why" and "how to," this workshop will provide an array of practical tools and examples to empower participants to put into practice what they have learned. This seminar will be assisted by students from Unity Christian High School, who will participate in biblical storytelling, scripture tableaux, and choral readings using a variety of biblical literary genres.

Seminar 6: Worship 101: Introduction to Principles and Invitation to Practice
Eric Mathis, Paul Ryan, and students from Samford University and Calvin College
Learning to lead worship takes practice, but where does one begin? In this seminar, we will present five vital worship leadership practices and the principles that shape and sustain them. We will learn about praying publicly, choosing music, speaking introductions and transitions, telling stories, and the planning process that pulls these practices, and more, together. Along the way we will see examples and hear testimonies from students. We will engage in exercises and share together around tables. By the end, participants will have many opportunities to practice skills and gather valuable resources for future planning and learning in their communities of worship.

Seminar 7: Until Justice and Peace Embrace: Worship that Announces and Shapes Reconciliation
David Bailey, Mwenda Ntarangwi, Kathy Smith, Nicholas Wolterstorff, moderated by David Rylaarsdam
Public worship and reconciliation are deeply connected. In worship, we announce the good news of reconciliation in Christ in sermons and songs. But we don't speak or sing about it. In worship, we also practice habits that are fundamental building blocks of reconciliation: we confess sin, pass the peace to each other, and gather in unity around Christ's table. At its best, public worship both announces and participates in Christ-shaped reconciliation.

Yet this is not easy, especially when congregations are marked by divisions and conflict. What about churches that sing about reconciliation and unity, but seem unwilling or unable to address conflict in healthy ways? What about divisions that keep us separated across ethnic and socio-economic lines? What about centuries-old conflict that seems so much bigger than any congregation can really address?

This seminar will explore tangible ways for communities to grow in the capacity to announce, celebrate, and practice Christ-centered reconciliation in worship and community life. This seminar is for leaders of both new and established congregations, for leaders who work in faith formation and youth ministry, for preachers and lay leaders and worshipers. 

This seminar will include:

  • A spotlight on how David Bailey and East End Fellowship in Richmond, Virginia, has made several tangible strides in shaping an urban community that transcends cultural and socio-economic lines,
  • Reflections on worship in times of conflict and crisis by author and pastor Kathy Smith,
  • Insights on how "justice and peace embrace" in worship and the Christian life by philosopher, liturgical theologian, and author Nicholas Wolterstoff,
  • Global examples from cultural anthropologist Mwenda Ntarangwi, with particular attention to issues of justice in youth culture, cultural expressions, and inter-cultural engagement.
  • Panelists Shannon Jammal-Hollemans, pastor and team leader for the Office of Social Justice for the Christian Reformed Church; and Sandra Van Opstal, pastor, author, and speaker on worship, missions, and justice issues.

Seminar 8: A New Song. A Skillful Song
Greg Scheer with Kelly Dobbs-Mickus and Graham Kendrick
Those of us who feel Psalm 33's call to write new songs must remember that the Psalm also tells us to play skillfully. In this seminar we will focus on the skills of songwriting for congregations, digging into what it means to balance inspiration and perspiration. Join music editor Kelly Dobbs-Mickus, singer-songwriter Graham Kendrick—composer of the most widely heard songs in the contemporary Christian worship worldwide—and songwriter-musician-producer Greg Scheer as they discuss approaches to creating new texts, new tunes, and combining of texts and tunes. The time will include an interview with worship director Erin Rose about a unique songwriting program at East End Fellowship in Richmond, VA. Participants of all levels and musical styles will benefit from this seminar.

Seminar 9: The ‘Turn Toward the Formative' in Contemporary Worship
John D. Witvliet with Miranda Dodson, Aaron Niequist, Glenn Packiam, Jeremy Zeyl
When the contemporary worship movement began in the 1960s or 70s or 80s or 90s (it started at different times in various places), it was often motivated by a desire to make worship more relevant—more expressive of the needs, hopes, and fears of rising generations of worshipers in a variety of cultural contexts. In the last decade or more, there has been a noticeable shift in the blogs, op-eds, and manifestos of several contemporary worship leaders, pastors, publishers, and teachers who are now calling for contemporary worship that is not only relevant, but also formative: worship that challenges believers to “grow in grace and in knowledge of our Lord and Savior.” The result is an outpouring of not only new songs, but also new kinds of songs; not only new services and publications, but new genres of services and publications.

This “turn toward the formative” is something to celebrate! But it is not easy. For this turn challenges us to rethink the consumer mentality that shapes so much of church life, even the church life of those of us who protest it!

Come ready to hear first-hand accounts and testimonies about this turn to the formative, and discuss what it might mean for faithful and vital worship in your community.

Retreats: 

While We Are Waiting, Yielded and Still
Dale Cooper
This retreat will be limited to fifteen people who will spend this time together in a home setting, also enjoying fellowship over the noon meal. In this day of quiet together, we will

  • ponder afresh “how deep the Father’s love for us;”
  • enjoy “sweet communion” with Jesus; and
  • pledge anew, God’s Spirit helping us, “with one holy passion,” to return our Lover’s love.

Learning Christ-Centered Lament: Worship and Reconciliation in Light of a 600-Year Pattern of Systemic Injustice
Mark Charles and Steve Prince
Participants in this experiential four-hour retreat will lay the foundation for a 5-month conversation, designed for members who desire to engage in an extended dialogue about the shape of worship and reconciliation in light of centuries-old patterns of injustice. The retreat will grapple with the 600-year history of the “Doctrine of Discovery” that shaped—and continues to shape—European and majority cultural responses to Native American, and African turned American communities in North America. This pattern transcends the Americas and reverberates in many nations around the world, many of which are represented at the Worship Symposium. 

Mark Charles and Steve Prince will facilitate critical engagement, experiential learning exercises, and the creation of artistic responses to the historical scars with candid, constructive discussions to formulate faith-filled, Gospel-centered expressions of lament and reconciliation for both public worship and social witness. Following the Worship Symposium, participants will be invited to continue the discussion for several months on-line. The culminating project will be the creation of an artistic “communal quilt” as a tangible signifier of the individual/communal work that we will experience.

The purpose of this extended conversation is to engage the individuals affixed to the various international communities through a process of lament and discernment of the practices that help us testify to the kind of reconciliation that comes through Christ. This retreat experience of reconciliation will transcend the systemic political and cultural divides that so often separate us and create a foundation built on truth and the hope of renewal.

Vespers

For the Healing of the Nations: a Candlelight Liturgy of Scripture, Silence and Simple Song
Led by Susan Briehl, Tom Witt, and a team of musicians
Using a musical setting of Evening Prayer written by Marty Haugen, we gather around a large map at the world with the cross, our Tree of Life, at its center to pray for nations, places, and peoples in need of healing, hope, and peace. 

Worship & Reconciliation across Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Cultural Lines
Led by David Bailey and the Urban Doxology band
What does worship look like for the urban context? What does worship look like for a church that is economically, educationally, and culturally diverse? Reconciliation is a key theme of worship all year long at East End Fellowship Church in Richmond, Virginia. In this service, their own music and worship leaders invite us into the sound of reconciliation in their urban context, with prayers and music that draw deeply on ancient patterns of worship. Come ready to taste and see how the Spirit is active in Christ-centered reconciliation through public congregational worship that intentionally crosses cultural and socioeconomic divides in a gospel-centered way.

Singing the Story: Hymns for Holy Week
Led by Eileen Guenther
Congregational singing invites us to not just think about the events of Holy Week, but to become participants in unfolding drama of Christ's passion and resurrection. Through song we explore what it means to be united with Christ in his dying and rising (Rom. 6:4). Come ready to sing the story of the events that unfold from Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday, with songs from Psalms for All Seasons and Lift Up Your Hearts, and to prepare your hearts for your own shaping of Holy Week services this coming spring.

One Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church: Psalms that Sing the Church’s Mission
Led by C. Michael Hawn, Jorge Lockward, Martin Tel, and the Princeton Seminary Choir
What a joy to gather with Christians from all over the world in this Symposium! In this service, we will sing music that expresses our joy and our calling to live and work together as part of Christ's body in the world. We will pay attention to way that biblical Psalms express all four of these key themes, centuries before these four marks of the church came together in the Nicene Creed. The songs and prayers in this service could be used on almost any occasion, but would be especially poignant during celebrations of Pentecost.

“We’ve Come This Far by Faith:” Our Story, Our Song
Led by Emmett Price, III, and James Abbington and several alumni from the James Abbington Church Music Academy
This vesper service will feature the inspiring prayers, songs, and readings from the African American worship tradition past and present.

Ancient Words and Modern Music: A Fresh Musical Interpretation of the Heidelberg Catechism
Led by Jeremy Zeyl and band
Jeremy Zeyl and band from Canada will lead worshipers in a musical journey through original songs based on selections from the Heidelberg Catechism. This multi-denominational group will display how to effectively combine theological depth with a modern contemporary worship style. With hints of folk, rock, alternative, singer-songwriter and gospel genres, this music both breathes new life into the well-loved catechism and serves as a compelling summary of Christian theology which has been received with appreciation across the spectrum of Christian denominations. This worship time will focus on enabling attendees to sing along with the band and deepen their worship and reflection through participation in select liturgical passages that accompany certain songs and are also based on the catechism.

6:00 – 6:50 pm options:

Between the Shadow and the Light – A Traveling Exhibition Out of South Africa
An informal reception and opportunity to view the art exhibit

Using Hymnary.org's FlexScores to Include Instruments in Worship
Harry Plantinga and Greg Scheer
Many churches have band and orchestra instrumentalists eager to play in worship, but church music directors don't always have the time or skill to arrange and transpose music for them. Hymnary.org's new FlexScore feature allows directors to quickly and cheaply print off music for flute, tuba, alto sax or viola. Harry Plantinga and Greg Scheer, co-founders of Hymnary.org, will demonstrate how the FlexScore feature works and show how to creatively use instruments in worship.

 

7:00 pm Worship services:

Tim Blackmon, preaching, 2 Corinthians 1:1-11: The Comfort of God
With participation by Eileen Guenther, organ
Calvin College Chapel

Pablo Jiménez, preaching, 2 Corinthians 2:12-3:6: The New Covenant
Covenant Fine Arts Center Auditorium

8:30 am Worship services:

M. Craig Barnes, preaching, 2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2: The Ministry of Reconciliation
With participation by the Princeton Theological Seminary Choir, directed by Martin Tel
Calvin College Chapel

Meg Jenista, preaching, 2 Corinthians 4:1-12: God’s All-Surpassing Power
With participation by the Calvin College Worship Apprentices
Covenant Fine Arts Center Auditorium

Plenary Sessions

Public Worship and the Many Layers of Gospel-Shaped Reconciliation
David Bailey, Mwenda Ntarangwi, Kathy Smith, Nicholas Wolterstorff, moderated by David Rylaarsdam

Church History as an Indispensable Source of Wisdom for Contemporary Ministry
Catherine Gunsalus González, Justo González, Karin Maag, Jerry Sittser, moderated by Karin Maag

 

Session A workshops:

AL: Lunch break

A1: The Treasure of African American Worship Traditions: Insights and Wisdom for Churches in Every Cultural Context
Friday: James Abbington, Eileen Guenther, C. Michael Hawn, William Heard, moderated by John D. Witvliet
Saturday: James Abbington, Michael Gittens, Emmett Price, moderated by John D. Witvliet
This session will explore the depth, riches, wisdom, and insights that have emerged through several centuries of Christian worship among African-American communities in North America—and the way these gifts can bless and strengthen all kinds of churches—both multicultural churches and culturally homogenous churches, both African-American churches and churches of other ethnic and cultural groups, both churches in North America and beyond. The session will highlight themes developed in a wonderful new publication: Readings in African American Church Music and Worship, ed. James Abbington (GIA Publications, Inc.), and suggest practical strategies for further learning in your context. 

A2: Preaching to the Elder Brother
M. Craig Barnes
Most of our expressions of the Gospel are focused on prodigals. Most of the people who come to church are elder brothers. So how do you preach to people who have not made a mess of their lives?

A3: Is Someone Missing? 
Joyce Borger
When your congregation gathers for corporate worship is there a demographic from your community that is missing or underrepresented? This workshop will take a beginning look at practices from churches intentionally including children through older adults, individuals with disabilities, and folks of different backgrounds to better represent the body of Christ in full, active, and conscious participation. Come prepared to share your congregation's best practices as well so we can learn from each other.

A4: Harmony on the Staff: Preachers and Musicians Should Be Friends
Wendie Brockhaus and Mike Graves
We usually think of harmony in relation to music, but it also applies to church staffs. In the musical Oklahoma the farmer and cowman weren't always friends, the one protecting turf and the other desiring freedom. Unfortunately, something similar happens with preachers and musicians who must work together weekly in planning and leading the church's worship. Preachers don't always understand music and musicians who must plan worship well in advance; musicians don't always have theological training and appreciate the weekly burden of sermon preparation which can be in flux down to the very last moment. In this interactive workshop led by a preacher and musician we will explore how the two groups can better understand and appreciate each other.

A5: Singing for Faith Formation: Nourishing Songs for Worship
Norma de Waal Malefyt and Rebecca Snippe
Our time together will explore song resources especially from the new songbook Lift Up Your Hearts and their selection process that will guide a congregation’s faith development through song. We will think about how songs that are chosen not only express, but form faith. 

A6: Moving Worship: What IS Liturgical Dance?
Julia Start Fletcher
Christian liturgy consists of a holy conversation between God and the gathered community. Dance, movement, and gesture may seem silent—but they powerfully shape our experience of this conversation. Come ready to explore how dance, movement, and gesture can be used in many different elements of the worship dialogue, both through leadership of trained dancers and in people in the pews. 

A7: From Outreach to Embracing: A Johannine Model for Community Engagement
Denise Kingdom Grier
The synoptic gospels have successfully moved the church from 'in-reach' to 'outreach,' but the fourth gospel helps the church one step further from 'one sided outreach' to a 'reciprocal embrace.' Explore what this means for how congregations embrace their communities.

A8: Visual Arts in Worship: Purposefulness in its Use Today
Betsy Steele Halstead
The visual arts can reflect the deeper meaning and purpose of worship. We will explore how the visual has influenced corporate worship and how art plays a broad range of roles in worship. We will discover the biblical foundation for encouraging disciplined creativity, see how every space speaks theologically, and consider the purpose-full visual elements of worship.

A9: Worship and Pastoral Care
Melissa Haupt
Considering worship as a context for pastoral care may arouse suspicion. After all, worship is not group therapy or a group support session. Yet, there is an inherent connection between worship and pastoral care that is often overlooked or dismissed. True pastoral care cannot take place apart from a worshiping community—and the community at worship creates an environment in which people can experience healing. This workshop will help participants explore how souls are cared for in worship and liturgy. Participants will identify gaps between lived experience and liturgical expression. Together we will examine liturgies and consider their capacity to both heal and hurt.

A10: Overcoming Homiletic Fatigue
Pablo Jiménez
Those who preach Sunday after Sunday often become weary—whether they’re experienced and have been in the pulpit a long time or are still new to the demands of preaching week after week, wondering how they can keep up the pace of continuing to prepare new sermons that speak God’s Word with vitality. This workshop will explore ways to reenergize your preaching.
Offered Friday in English and Saturday in Spanish.

A11: The Apostle Paul on Worship: Paul as a Worship Consultant to the Corinthian Church
Todd E. Johnson
In this workshop we will explore two worship issues central to 1 Corinthians. Paul identifies up front that one of his central concerns regarding the church at Corinth is their lack of unity (1:10ff). First, we will examine how the issues of a divided church plays out in their celebration of the Lord’s Supper and the implications that has for our celebrations of the Lord’s Table today. Second, we will examine how Paul identifies the strength of diversity—and its potential downsides—in the liturgical gatherings of the community. This will lead to our consideration of how Paul’s principles might play out in the planning and leading of worship in our churches today.

A12: Just Show Up: Bible Listening Gatherings
Charles Kim
Learn more about a unique book club where listening to extended Bible passages is the key activity for the group. The purpose of this gathering is to rediscover the value of the public reading and listening to scripture as it has been done during the early church and throughout Christian history. In partnership with Grace and Mercy Foundation based in New York City, Charles Kim has been starting and actively promoting “Bible Listening Gatherings” and “Just Show Up” book clubs at various locations, including corporate offices on Wall Street, university lecture halls, local coffee shops, and international locations. Participants will learn why, what, and how to practice Bible Listening Gatherings as a unique form of worship.

A13: Worship in Calvin’s Geneva: Challenges and Opportunities Then and Now
Karin Maag
Based on her forthcoming edited volume of primary sources on worship in Calvin’s Geneva, Karin Maag will outline what happened in Geneva as the city moved from Catholicism to Protestantism. How did that change affect worship? How did the population react? What can we learn for today about fruitful interactions between clergy and laity on worship issues? Participants should come prepared to sing Genevan Psalms (no advance knowledge required!).

A14: Sticky Liturgies: Worship, Youth Ministry, and the Faith of America’s Teenagers
Eric Mathis
Research has shown that young people are abandoning the faith and leaving the church by the time they graduate from college. Might worship be part of the problem? This interactive workshop will briefly examine major studies in adolescent spirituality, explore multiple worship paradigms within individual congregations, and encourage reflection on the relationship between liturgical practice and adolescent spirituality.

A15: More Than Missional: What are Sundays for?
Glenn Packiam
Why does the church gather together? We will explore three models for answering that question, and the ecclesiology that results. As a case study, Packiam will draw from his experience at his own non-denominational, evangelical mega-church, whose mantra was once, “Reach the lost at any cost,” but is now changing the shape of its liturgy—and with it, its ecclesiology.

A16: Iconic Woodcuts: A Message to the Congregation
Steve Prince
We all have a story that was divinely crafted by God. In this 4 hour workshop (meets over sessions A, B, and C), we will explore the ageless craft of creating woodcuts. Participants will be challenged to delve into their personal narrative to create an original woodcut that reflects their walk with Christ. In this hands-on time, participants will learn how to translate their story into visual iconography, use traditional and non-traditional power tools to carve the woodblock, drawing and transfer processes, and safety techniques. Upon completion participants will utilize an etching press to print a small edition of prints to share with their respective congregations as a visual, tangible testimony of their journey to Christ. No experience is necessary, just a willingness to explore, express, and share the Gospel through art!
Limited to 20 people

A17: Leading Worship in a Post-Christian, Low-Biblical Literacy Age: Practical Lessons from Church History about the Catechetical Dimensions of Worship
Jerry Sittser
When we gather for worship, we long to have many people present who do not yet know the Bible well. We also long to have life-long worshipers, including our children and youth, come to know the Bible well. How can worship be led in ways that embrace these goals, in ways that foster greater love for and knowledge of God's word? How can church history challenge us to imagine very practical ways of shaping warm, instructive, life-giving worship practices?

A18: Psalmody for Holy Week
Martin Tel and the Princeton Seminary Choir
The gospel writers relied heavily on the Psalms to tell the story of Christ’s suffering and crucifixion. Using the Psalter resource Psalms for All Seasons, we will explore different ways that the congregation can engage the Psalms in Holy Week services.

A19: The Next Worship: Coming to the Table with the Global Church
Sandra Van Opstal

A20: Art and Forgiveness
Jo-Ann Van Reeuwyk
Using examples from South Africa, a nation where forgiveness and reconciliation are exemplified, this session will focus on how Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s concept of Ubuntu (Zulu) and the utilization of the arts have led to deep forgiveness. Find out how these examples from South Africa can be translated into worship services and church school in our own environments.

A21: Children’s Books about Worship
Kristen Verhulst
There are a number of wonderful picture and children’s books that help church school leaders, educators, and parents teach children about worship. These books focus on the sacraments, Christian year, the psalms, and prayer. Children's books provide another means to welcome and engage children (and adults!) in worship as full members of the body of Christ.

A22: Worship and “Glocal” Mission
A panel moderated by Anne Zaki
Join this group of panelists as they explore the mutual influence of global + local (glocal) mission on each other. The panelists include those from countries outside North America as well as those involved in missions in North America in various forms. This session gives room for the interdisciplinary and diverse approach to worship and missions that is best suited to the opportunities and needs of 21st century ministry.

A23: Heidelberg: New Songs from the Catechism
Jeremy Zeyl
Jeremy will share, teach, and outline the writing of a number of song selections from his multi-album Heidelberg Project. Along with his band from Canada, Jeremy will share resources and his journey in setting songs from this beautiful text into music that are stylistically current for today's culture. Along with receiving scores and lyrics to certain songs, attendees will be invited to sing along and discuss the importance of bringing sound theology into new contemporary worship songs.

Session B workshops:

BL: Lunch break

B1: GIA Choral Reading Session
James Abbington
Participation in this choral reading session is open to all, especially choir directors and accompanists. Each participant will receive a packet of complimentary SATB octavos from various GIA choral series. Packets are only available by attending the reading session.

B2: Projecting your Message: Designing Screens for Effective Communication
Margaret Allotey-Pappoe 
Many churches use large screen projection systems for worship and other congregational events. The staff that use these systems often have little training in visual design. This session will review important design elements such as layout, images, typography, and color. What is effective? What is not effective? We will look at how design choices impact effective communication to your worshiping community.

B3: Worship and Discipleship: Unresolved Questions in Contemporary Ministry
Friday: M. Craig Barnes, Joyce Borger, Fernando Cascante-Gomez, and Denise Kingdom Grier moderated by John D. Witvliet
Saturday: Tim Blackmon, Eileen Guenther, Jorge Lockward, Chris Schoon, and Anne Zaki moderated by John D. Witvliet
This workshop will feature candid, wide-ranging discussions about the most important themes that worshiping communities may need to address in the next 10 years. We will briefly look back on conversations of 10 and 20 years ago to reflect on the topics that were at the center of our attention then. Then we will imagine together what a Worship Symposium program in 2025 might look like. The goal is to discern together how we can walk in step with Spirit's redemptive work in the world, responding to emerging needs and opportunities in faithful, creative ways. The session will be facilitated with a process that could easily be adapted for use in your church, school, or ministry context. 

B4: Water, Wheat, and Honey: A Recipe for Abundant Life
Susan Briehl
In this workshop we will join the surprising journey of a group of emerging adults who volunteered to help fourth graders bake bread for their first Communion. With them we will travel on "paths as yet untrodden through perils unknown" in our common search for a faithful way of life in and for the world.

B5: Seven Streams: Negotiating the Widening River of Congregational Song
Emily Brink
We’ll explore both Glory to God (Presbyterian) and Lift Up Your Hearts (Christian Reformed Church and Reformed Church in America), both published in 2013, for how they included many newer streams of congregational song that have joined the traditional hymn. Have you noticed that few contemporary “hymnals” today even use the word “hymn” or “hymnal” in their titles? “Hymns” don’t acknowledge the many different streams that have joined the main river of congregational song, including choruses, responses, spirituals, contemporary songs of all types, and global songs. How do congregations, let alone hymnals, respond to all that diversity? How do we swim in this much wider river of song?

B6: Transforming Sermon Communication: A Practical Guide to Making Changes That Make a Difference
Lori J. Carrell
Hundreds of preachers changed their preaching preparation habits in ways that made a difference in the spiritual journeys of their 30,000+ listeners. What did they do? How did they do it? What can others, who speak the Word, learn from their experiences? In this workshop, participants will discover practical answers to these questions through the stories of preachers and listeners documented over several years. If you believe that the spoken Word can make a difference for individuals, congregations, communities, and culture, attend this workshop with high expectations.

B7: Contextualized Worship
Mark Charles

B8: Worship and “Glocal” Mission
A panel moderated by María Cornou
Join this group of panelists as they explore the mutual influence of global + local (glocal) mission on each other. The panelists include those from countries outside North America as well as those involved in missions in North America in various forms. This session gives room for the interdisciplinary and diverse approach to worship and missions that is best suited to the opportunities and needs of 21st century ministry.

B9: Songwriting from the Inside
Greg Scheer
Friday: Miranda Dodson, Graham Kendrick, Glenn Packiam
Saturday: David Bailey, Aaron Niequist, Jeremy Zeyl
Every week congregations sing songs old and new, but rarely think about where they come from. In this workshop, moderator Greg Scheer talks to three songwriters about their writing process, the contexts for which they write, and the things that inspire and challenge them. Join us as we learn from these seasoned songwriters and gain a deeper appreciation of the songs we sing.

B10: Worship Accompaniment and Improvisation 101 for the Church Pianist
Diane Dykgraaf
This workshop is for the pianist or keyboardist who can read music but desires to expand their stylistic palate. We will explore ways to assist the gathered congregation in singing songs using several styles of music, including contemporary praise music, gospel, traditional hymnody, and others. Examples will be given of simple to moderate improvisation techniques that are true to the style and text, adding interest and variety to the music.

B11: Resources in the Ancient Church for Today's Worship/Lecciones del culto antiguo para la iglesia de hoy 
Catherine Gunsalus González 
Offered Friday in English and Saturday in Spanish.

B12: Accessible Gospel, Inclusive Worship: Vertical Habits In Action
Betty Grit and Barbara Newman
This workshop will give practical and innovative ideas for welcoming people of all ability levels into your worship service by using the framework of Vertical Habits—a set of habits that identify the words of worship that form our relationship with God and the way we live out our faith. Worship leaders, pastors, education volunteers, and worship planners will discover new ways to have each one enter into your corporate conversation with God.

B13: The Art of Collaboration
Linda Witte Henke
This workshop will delve into the opportunities and challenging ingredient in the collaborative creation of liturgical art. Award-winning liturgical artist Linda Witte Henke will use images and narratives from a variety of collaborative projects to invite participants into consideration of guiding principles, group dynamics, and practical considerations for creating liturgical art in collaboration. 

B14: Preaching Process: What To Do Between Parsing and Pulpit
Meg Jenista
Assuming a preacher does her homework and spends time in ancient texts and modern commentaries and assuming a preacher stands in front of his congregation with a word to speak that is both thoughtful and creative, how does said pastor get from assumption one to assumption two? This is a brainstorming workshop for preachers (and others) who desire to engage the text faithfully, the congregation collaboratively, and the task of sermon-craft imaginatively.

B15: Outward-Faced Worship
Tom Jennings
Is Christian worship for the believer or the skeptic? Is its purpose edification or evangelism? Should worship have depth and substance or should it be accessible to those who know little or nothing about the faith? With I Corinthians 14 as our guide, we will see that the answer to the above questions is an unequivocal “yes!” Tom Jennings will lead this workshop, drawing on 20 years of experience as the worship director at Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City.

B16: Biblical Storytelling Master Class
Joy-Elizabeth Lawrence
In 1 Timothy, Paul says, ". . . devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture," to his friend Timothy. One way we can devote ourselves to Scripture is by learning it by heart and telling it others. In this workshop, participants will be invited to participate by presenting, in the style of a storyteller, Scripture passages they have learned by heart. Participants are invited (not required) to present a text they have worked on in advance for discussion, encouragement, and constructive critique. Those who are unfamiliar with this style of Scripture presentation may hear familiar texts anew!

B17: Glorifying God in Worship
Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
The Scriptures are full of glory. Israel is told by prophets to "give glory to the Lord." Angels at Jesus' birth sing "Glory to God in the highest heaven." In John's Gospel the Father and the Son glorify each other. And in the Psalms and I Chronicles people are told to "ascribe to the Lord glory and strength. Ascribe to the Lord the glory of his name." But how would this go in worship today? What, exactly, does it mean to glorify God in worship? Isn't God already maximally splendid? What more can mere mortals add?

B18: Hip Hop and Worship: Dealing with the Dilemma
Emmett G. Price III
Why is the church still wrestling with whether to engage or not engage Hip Hop Culture, particularly Hip Hop created and performed by Christian artists? Is there such a thing as Christian Hip Hop? This session will offer timely commentary, critical analysis, and an overview of emerging practices for the use of Hip Hop as a means of worship for intergenerational communities of faith.

B19: Praises Plans and Pauses: Music as Liturgical Punctuation
Ron Rienstra
Many congregations see the value in using music in worship not as a liturgical activity in its own right, but as an artistic activity that deepens fundamental liturgical moments and that serves the work of the people. In this session, we’ll go one step further and consider how music can be used incidentally, yet in meaningful ways, to punctuate a worship service: to direct the assembly where to pause and where to rush ahead, to help the congregation to sense how one thing connects to another, and to invite worshipers to exclaim or to ponder, etc. We will consider music in a wide variety of expressive styles, both instrumental music and shorter songs sung by and for the congregation. 

B20: In-Between Words
Paul Ryan and the Calvin College Worship Apprentices
Scripture readings, sermons, and songs take up most of the time in a worship service. But it's often what happens in between them that is most telling. Those little words and phrases that welcome guests, introduce songs, and prepare us for prayer make all the difference for encouraging full participation in worship. These phrases are crucial for extending hospitality and for forming congregations for deep engagement with God and each other.

B21: Ancient Wisdom for Preachers
David Rylaarsdam
After sixteen centuries, the wisdom and habits of ancient preachers remains remarkably relevant. Like us, early Christian leaders preached in cultures addicted to entertainment. These preachers struggled with the desire to be well-liked by their listeners and they wondered about the best ways to persuade people to be better lovers of God and their neighbors. In this workshop, Augustine and John Chrysostom will be our primary guides as we reflect on the joys and challenges of proclaiming the Gospel. 

B22: Liturgy, Anthropology, and Life Cycle
Kathy Smith
How do children worship best? How can worship help young people through the teen years? What practices of worship resonate most with adults and elderly people? This workshop will look at the human life cycle and the developmental stages that all people grow through (cognitive, sensorimotor, psychological, moral, and faith development), and will consider what this means for all ages to participate fully in worship.

B23: "Psalms for All Seasons" as a Resource for Choirs
Martin Tel
The choir is an excellent conduit for bringing psalmody back into the heart of worshiping communities. Members of the Princeton Seminary Choir will demonstrate how musical settings from the psalter Psalms for All Seasons can be augmented by the choir or presented as choral anthems. Particular attention will be given to resourcing the smaller church ensemble or intergenerational choirs.

B24: Links in the Liturgy: Creating “Flow” in a Worship Service
Howard Vanderwell
Are your worship services more like a novel which pursues a common theme, or a magazine that has a whole collection of elements which may (or may not) have much to do with each other? Vital worship can often be strengthened by an overall theme which holds it all together faithfully, and worship leaders will want to understand how creating links can help the service to be a complete conversation with God, flowing smoothly from one step to another. While this takes different forms in different worship traditions, we’ll explore the importance of these links, how best to create them, and how that shapes our leadership roles.

B25: Preaching as Poetry in an Age of Math
Paul Scott Wilson
In our postmodern age, preachers may need a new vision of preaching as poetry in order to reclaim the theological center of the preaching task. Here we will consider some practices to assist that vision.

Session C workshops:

C1: Conference Choir Rehearsal
Directed by James Abbington, C. Michael Hawn, and Jorge Lockward
The conference choir will participate in the Saturday afternoon communion worship service. Please attend C1 on both Friday and Saturday.

C2: Between the Shadow and the Light: Artists’ Prophetic Responses to South Africa Today
Margaret Allotey-Pappoe and Jo-Ann Van Reeuwyk, moderated by Joel Carpenter
In June 2013, a team of ten North American and ten Southern African artists gathered in South Africa for a two-week seminar and studio event that engaged five issues with which South African artists struggle and question: remembrance, resistance, reconciliation, representation, and revisioning. Artists were asked to create a work of art in response to their experience. The traveling art exhibit “Between the Shadow and the Light” is the collection of responses. Joel Carpenter, director of the Nagel Institute for the Study of World Christianity—a sponsor of this seminar—will moderate a discussion with two of the artists.

C3: Becoming Instruments of God: Singing and Worship
Awet Andemicael
How can we, as musicians and lay and ordained ministers, cultivate our bodies as active instruments of God? In this workshop, participants will engage in guided spiritual-musical exercises to explore how the imagination, breath, vocal tone, and words—offered to God—can facilitate embodied individual and communal experiences of prayer, praise, and worship. Participants will also discuss how spiritual-musical formation such as this can enhance their effectiveness in music leadership roles in congregational settings.

C4: Principles of an Urban Doxology
David Bailey and Erin Rose
What does worship look like for the urban context? What does worship look like for a church that is economically, educationally, and culturally diverse? What songs do we sing in our worship that speak about reconciliation, justice, and shalom? An urban doxology is the practice of a public worship (liturgy, preaching, music, and arts) that intentionally crosses racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic divides in a gospel-centered way.
In this workshop, we will explore the guiding principles for contextualizing worship for a racially, economically, and culturally diverse worship context.

C5: How (Not) to Preach in the Secular Age.
Tim Blackmon
Many of my friends have a very different take on life. They hope to find personal significance without God. The gospel story I preach seems neither plausible or all that relevant. Philosopher Charles Taylor explains "we are now living in a spiritual supernova, a kind of galloping pluralism on the spiritual plane." This workshop is a brief field guide on how (not) to preach and teach the gospel in a secular age. 

C6: Prayer around the Cross: Unpacking the Liturgies
Susan Briehl and Tom Witt
Discover the shape and essential elements of this meditative form of prayer akin to the practices Taizé, Iona, and Holden Village, a center for renewal in Washington State. Explore both musical and liturgical resources and imagine how to incorporate or create such liturgies in your setting. Participants in this workshop are encouraged to attend the vesper service at 4:15 on Thursday and Friday, led by Susan Briehl and Tom Witt, before attending this workshop.

C7: What North American Churches Can Learn from the Church in Pakistan
Emily Brink and Eric Sarwar
Join this conversation between Eric Sarwar, a Presbyterian pastor from Pakistan, and Emily Brink, Worship Institute staff member, about how Pakistani worship practices can bless and inform the Christian church in North America. Learn more about how Pakistani Christian worship in a largely oral culture in an Islamic context. Several years ago Emily was hosted by Eric in worship conference in Karachi. They are now collaborating on transcribing raga-based psalms and various writing projects while he is studying in North America.

C8: Listening to Your Listeners: A Preaching Preparation Process That Changes…Everything!
Lori J. Carrell
A vast majority of listeners attending U.S. churches have never talked with a pastor about a sermon. And, unfortunately, those listeners report by the thousands that though they expect spiritual growth as they listen to their preachers, it usually does not occur. Preachers who listen to their listeners as a regular part of sermon preparation can expect to change these patterns, increasing the spiritual impact of preaching for individuals, congregations, communities—and culture. During this workshop, participants will discover how diverse congregations have established and maintained pre-sermon dialogue groups (without adding to the preachers’ limited sermon prep time!). 
Offered Friday in English and Saturday in Spanish.

C9: The Multicultural Dance: Its Implications for Christian Worship
Fernando A. Cascante-Gómez
Using the imagery of “dancing” and based on the encounter of Jesus with the Syrophoenician woman as presented in the gospel of Mathew, participants in this workshop will be able to distinguish three steps to follow for relating with people from other cultural/ethnic backgrounds. Together we will discern some conceptual and practical implications of those steps when it comes to planning and implementing worship in a multicultural context.

C10: The Church as Intergenerational Community
Todd Cioffi with a panel of Calvin College students
There is much talk about the importance of “Christian community.” What is meant by that? Is it the same as the “church”? Is it possible to have one without the other? How do different generations relate to each other within this community? A panel of Calvin College students will address what Christian community means to them, how it relates to the church, why it matters in the world, and how they may think differently about this topic than previous generations. They will also reflect on the significance of worship in terms of establishing and maintaining intergenerational Christian community both within and beyond the church’s walls.

C11: Christlike Patience: A Mark of a Congregation’s Spiritual Maturity
Dale Cooper
Honest followers of Jesus sometimes have honest differences. Patience—long-tempered longsuffering—is one of the Spirit’s gifts to help a congregation’s members handle their differences in a healthy and God-pleasing manner. In this workshop we’ll explore what Christian patience is and how to practice it.

C12: Wise Practices of Communication and Social Networking
Phil de Haan
There are so many ways to communicate these days, both personally and professionally. How do individuals and churches keep up with the latest ways to communicate? Is it important to be on Facebook and Twitter and Pinterest and.... Sometimes it gets overwhelming. So, let's talk about the communication landscape in 2015 and our place in it.

C13: Singing the Creeds
Miranda Dodson
Together we will discuss the Apostles’ Creed and the Nicene Creed and examine a few musical versions of each. Creeds, by nature were not written to be sung and therefore lack essential musical elements, which make the singing creeds word-for-word not only impractical, but nearly impossible! However, the aim of this workshop is to explore combining the powerful proclamations of creeds with the soul-stirring unity of song to enrich congregational and personal worship.

C14: Moving Worship: How to Create Movement
Julia Start Fletcher
Where do we start? How do we even begin to create movement? Where can we find inspiration? Join us, and find out how to put dances together; whether you’re working with trained dancers, or not trained “pedestrians.”

C15: Accompanying in the Gospel Style with Organ and Piano
Michael Gittens
When organists and pianists accompany hymns together they often limit themselves to the notes they find on the page. The effect can be that everything sounds the same. In this session, church musician Michael Gittens will demonstrate techniques for creating clear, rhythmic and inspiring accompaniments in the gospel style, playing to the strengths of each instrument.

C16: The Most Important Word in Preaching
Mike Graves
Since the inception of the New Homiletic in the 1970s, preachers have been experimenting with inductive and narrative forms of preaching, thanks to the likes of Fred Craddock and Eugene Lowry. The idea is for sermons to engage people, create an experience of the biblical text. In recent years, however, some critics have noted a lack of biblical exposition among narrative preachers, and this at a time of biblical and theological illiteracy among congregations. In this interactive workshop we will explore the tension and talk about what may be the most important word in preaching, narrative, or otherwise.

C17: The Power of Spirituals
Eileen Guenther
Spirituals come out of a particular time and place, a truly painful part of history. Yet that context of pain and suffering gave us "sorrow songs," and also gave us songs of hope and liberation. The music comes directly out of the slaves' experiences and enabled them to "sing what they could not say." This is music that speaks to and for us today, music of tremendous emotional power, that connects us with the strength of the human spirit and the power of faith of those enslaved, just as it connects us with each other in our common humanity and most of all, with God.

C18: Preaching the Fruit of the Spirit
Scott Hoezee
How can the preacher urge the production of spiritual fruit among the congregation's members, without preaching a moralistic, self-help message that makes it sound as though the Christian life is rooted in how well we behave? How can the grace of the Gospel shine through even when the sermon is talking about developing Christian virtues? In this workshop we will explore how grace can remain prominent, even in sermons about the Fruit of the Spirit, as we also explore a few specific Fruit to ponder how to make these Spirit-filled virtues vital and intriguing for listeners.

C19: Reconciling with the Church
Shannon Jammal-Hollemans
Pope Francis recently said "Christians are not made in a laboratory, but in a community called the church." But what about those people for whom the church has been a source of pain? There are many of us with stories about being hurt by the church—whether because of race, sexuality, ability, age, gender or something else. In this workshop, participants will explore how congregations can cultivate worship that embraces those who bear scars inflicted by Christians. The session will outline common themes of reconciling worship, as well as practical examples to help church leaders identify tools and resources for implementing those themes in worship. 

C20: Psalm-Surfing
Graham Kendrick
Can we engage in sung worship together without knowing the songs, without a song-list or chord charts, using 100% God-inspired words, while being responsive to the Holy Spirit and creatively and musically adventurous all at the same time? I say yes! Come and see if you agree.

C21: Telling Stories in Worship: Principles and Practices
Eric Mathis and students from Samford University
This workshop will focus on telling stories in worship as well as the principles that shape and sustain this important worship leadership practice. While students will provide examples and discuss their own experiences with story-telling, workshop participants will be given the opportunity to practice their story telling skills as well as gather valuable resources for future planning and learning in their communities of faith.

C22: Worshiping a Christ Who is Hard to Know
Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
In the gospels Jesus seems to answer questions people did not ask. He abruptly switches topics. He unexpectedly falls silent. He exalts babies. He had to heal one man in two stages because he didn't get it quite right at first. He needs to pray all the time. Frankly put, like his Father, Jesus Christ can be known but he is also hard to know. With this stubborn fact in mind, how shall we worship him?

C23: From Missional Worship to Missional Living and Back Again
Chris Schoon
Mission and worship have quite a history of being kept separate from each other. But what if they were intended to flow into each other, to be mutually edifying? In this session, we’ll explore characteristics of a missional approach to worship, paying attention to how our communal worship forms us for a missional way of life and how this missional living in turn pours back into our communal worship.

C24: Praying and Leading with the Psalms
Carrie Steenwyk
This workshop will offer ideas and activities, many of which have been used with junior high, high school, and college youth, for working with the psalms in small groups or educational settings to prepare pieces that can help lead worship or devotional study. There will also be some discussion on adapting or augmenting these activities for various other ages, including children, adults, or intergenerational groups.

C25: Abraham Kuyper’s Surprisingly Relevant Theology of Liturgy
John D. Witvliet
Before Abraham Kuyper became a university leader and prime minister, he was a church historian and pastor. He wrote copiously and passionately about many topics, including both the devotional and liturgical dimension of worship. His writing offers much to challenge and deepen our own experience of worship, exploring how we can imagine heaven as we worship, how we can elicit sincere worship, and how we can perceive God's action in and through worship. Come ready to think theologically and to leave with a set of sparkling quotations to provoke discussions in your ministry contexts back home.

C26: Worship, Beauty, Justice, and Shalom
Nicholas Wolterstorff
In a recent essay on "Beauty & Justice," Nicholas Wolterstorff writes "what unites love of understanding, worship, beauty, and justice is that these are all dimensions of shalom. In shalom, understanding has replaced bewilderment, worship of God has replaced enmity, aesthetic delight has replaced revulsion, justice has replaced injustice." This workshop will explore the important relationship between liturgy, beauty, justice, and shalom and its influence on how we worship in our churches and worshiping communities, and engage in the cultural lives of our communities.

Friday Vespers

For the Healing of the Nations: a Candlelight Liturgy of Scripture, Silence and Simple Song
Led by Susan Briehl, Tom Witt, and a team of musicians
Using a musical setting of Evening Prayer written by Marty Haugen, we gather around a large map at the world with the cross, our Tree of Life, at its center to pray for nations, places, and peoples in need of healing, hope, and peace. 

Worship & Reconciliation across Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Cultural Lines 
Led by David Bailey and the Urban Doxology band
What does worship look like for the urban context? What does worship look like for a church that is economically, educationally, and culturally diverse? Reconciliation is a key theme of worship all year long at East End Fellowship Church in Richmond, Virginia. In this service, their own music and worship leaders invite us into the sound of reconciliation in their urban context, with prayers and music that draw deeply on ancient patterns of worship. Come ready to taste and see how the Spirit is active in Christ-centered reconciliation through public congregational worship that intentionally crosses cultural and socioeconomic divides in a gospel-centered way.

Singing the Story: Hymns for Holy Week 
Led by Eileen Guenther
Congregational singing invites us to not just think about the events of Holy Week, but to become participants in unfolding drama of Christ's passion and resurrection. Through song we explore what it means to be united with Christ in his dying and rising (Rom. 6:4). Come ready to sing the story of the events that unfold from Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday, with songs from Psalms for All Seasons and Lift Up Your Hearts, and to prepare your hearts for your own shaping of Holy Week services this coming spring.

One Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church: Psalms that Sing the Church’s Mission 
Led by C. Michael Hawn, Jorge Lockward, Martin Tel, and the Princeton Seminary Choir
What a joy to gather with Christians from all over the world in this Symposium! In this service, we will sing music that expresses our joy and our calling to live and work together as part of Christ's body in the world. We will pay attention to way that biblical Psalms express all four of these key themes, centuries before these four marks of the church came together in the Nicene Creed. The songs and prayers in this service could be used on almost any occasion, but would be especially poignant during celebrations of Pentecost.

“We’ve Come This Far by Faith:” Our Story, Our Song
Led by Emmett Price, III, and James Abbington and several alumni from the James Abbington Church Music Academy
This vesper service will feature the inspiring prayers, songs, and readings from the African American worship tradition past and present.

The Beauty of Christ
Miranda Dodson
Together we will gaze upon the beauty of the glory of Christ—the Son of God, our Savior, and King. By the grace of God, our hearts will be humbled by his majesty and our belief and devotion will be stirred by his glory and grace.

5:45 pm

Recital: Playing for the Glory of God
Calvin Honors Orchestra
This performance will include chamber works for string ensembles performed by members of the Calvin Honors Orchestra, a group of high-caliber high school age musicians from the West Michigan area.

Learn about Vital Worship: A Grants Program for Worshiping Communities
Led by the Vital Worship Grants Team
Would your church or organization be interested in a whole year of focusing on worship? Come and learn about the Vital Worship Grants Program at the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, which seeks to foster vital worship in congregations, parishes, and other worshiping communities in North America through projects on a wide variety of worship-related topics. Come learn how you might develop a grant proposal for 2016!

 

7:00 pm Friday night worship service 

Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center

Program repeats Friday schedule (see above) except for the following:

Workshops:

A10: Superando la fatiga homilética
Pablo Jiménez
Quienes predican domingo tras domingo a menudo se cansan—tanto aquellos predicadores experimentados que han estado en el púlpito por mucho tiempo como quienes son nuevos frente a las exigencias de la predicación semana tras semana, se preguntan cómo mantener el ritmo de preparar nuevos sermones que comuniquen la Palabra de Dios con vitalidad. Este taller explorará maneras de revitalizar su predicación.
Offered Friday in English and Saturday in Spanish.

A15: Iconic Woodcuts: A Message to the Congregation
Meets Friday only

B11: Resources in the Ancient Church for Today's Worship/Lecciones del culto antiguo para la iglesia de hoy 
Catherine Gunsalus González
Workshop on new book worship from the early church.
Offered Friday in English and Saturday in Spanish.

B25: "Psalms for All Seasons" as a Resource for Choirs
Meets Friday only

C9: La danza multicultural: Sus implicaciones para el culto cristiano
Fernando A. Cascante-Gómez
Usando la danza como metáfora y el texto de Mateo sobre el encuentro de Jesús con la mujer sirofenecia, los(as) participantes en este taller podrán distinguir tres pasos a seguir al relacionarnos con personas de diferentes trasfondos étnico-culturales. Juntos(as) discerniremos algunas de las implicaciones conceptuales y prácticas de esos pasos al planear e implementar el culto en un contexto multicultural.
Offered Friday in English and Saturday in Spanish.

C15: Accompanying in the Gospel Style with Organ and Piano
Michael Gittens
Meets Friday only

4:00 pm Closing communion service

2 Corinthians 9:6-15: God’s Generosity, Denise Kingdom Grier preaching
With participation by the Conference Choir
Calvin College Covenant Fine Arts Center

8:30 am and 11:00 am, Church of the Servant
3835 Burton St., Grand Rapids, MI 49546, phone: 616-956-7611
Premier of the winning song from “The New Psalm Contest.”
In an effort to encourage Psalm-singing, Church of the Servant began a psalm contest in 2010, an annual occasion for congregational songwriters to submit a Psalm-based song. Past song titles and winners include,

  • 2013: “Psalm 139: Search Me, O God” Kathy McGrath and Carol Browning
  • 2013: “Psalm 113: Who Is Like Our God?” Bruce Benedict and Wendell Kimbrough
  • 2012: “God of the Ages” (Psalm 90) David Ward
  • 2011: “Help Me Have the Faith of a Child” (Paraphrase of Psalm 131) Carol Browning
  • 2010: “All People That On Earth Do Dwell” (Psalm 100) Zac Hicks

9:30 am, Princeton Christian Reformed Church
5330 Kalamazoo Ave. SE, Kentwood, MI 49508, phone: 616-455-0110
Timothy Blackmon, preaching